As you know, this past Sunday was Reformation Sunday. Reformation day is one of my favorite celebrations of the church year. One of the reasons for that is that its a time when we sing “A Mighty Fortress.” It is also a time when I listen to many of Luther’s hymns. 

As I listen to Luther’s hymns, I am taken into the music by both the powerful tunes and lyrics. His songs vary from sounding like war songs, gregorian chant, or even like romantic lute songs. I am reminded of the shallow nature of so much music today. Luther’s hymns are powerful because they have lyrics that are doctrinally saturated. They are great tools of teaching the faith.

Along with the importance of good lyrics is the nature of the tunes. A good tune will have one singing it throughout the day, long after the worship service is over. I often find myself singing hymns after the service is over. 

As pastors, we need to be conscious of the music we use during our service. This doesn’t mean just picking songs from the LSB or the TLH or LBW, because even some Lutheran hymns fail to teach. Also, some of the best hymns aren’t included in these hymnals. These hymns should teach our people. They should be songs which will give our people something to think about and meditate on even after the service is over.

As you know, this past Sunday was Reformation Sunday. Reformation day is one of my favorite celebrations of the church year. One of the reasons for that is that its a time when we sing “A Mighty Fortress.” It is also a time when I listen to many of Luther’s hymns. 

As I listen to Luther’s hymns, I am taken into the music by both the powerful tunes and lyrics. His songs vary from sounding like war songs, gregorian chant, or even like romantic lute songs. I am reminded of the shallow nature of so much music today. Luther’s hymns are powerful because they have lyrics that are doctrinally saturated. They are great tools of teaching the faith.

Along with the importance of good lyrics is the nature of the tunes. A good tune will have one singing it throughout the day, long after the worship service is over. I often find myself singing hymns after the service is over. 

As pastors, we need to be conscious of the music we use during our service. This doesn’t mean just picking songs from the LSB or the TLH or LBW, because even some Lutheran hymns fail to teach. Also, some of the best hymns aren’t included in these hymnals. These hymns should teach our people. They should be songs which will give our people something to think about and meditate on even after the service is over.

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